ASCAP Board Election Selected Opponents Announced

Film Music Magazine • January 27, 2009

ASCAP has announced the opponents selected by the board Nominating Committee that will oppose the incumbent board members in next month’s ASCAP Board of Directors Election.

Significant among the handpicked opponents for the writer election are television composer Dan Foliart and reality composer David Vanacore, both well known in the industry. Additional writer opponents selected include Julio Reyes Copello, Lesley Gore, Mark Hollmann, Michael Korie, Russ Kunkel, Ralph MacDonald, Mel Marvin, Raul Midon, Paul Moravec, Rudy Perez and Matthew Wilder.

All of the writer incumbents with the exception of Stephen Schwartz are running for re-election, and include Richard Bellis, Marilyn Bergman, Bruce Broughton, Hal David, Wayland Holyfield, Johnny Mandel, Stephen Paulus, Valerie Simpson, Jimmy Webb, Paul Williams and Doug Wood.

Since the ASCAP Board created language that has rendered the nomination by petition process all but impossible by raising the number of signatures required for opponents not selected by the nominating committee from 25 in 2001 to over 1,330 currently, all incumbent board members who ran for re-election have been re-elected. No signatures of support are required for incumbents or those opponents selected by the nominating committee.

ASCAP members are allotted between zero and 100 votes each depending on their domestic royalty earnings in a designated period prior to the election. No voting records or attendance records of incumbent board members are available to ASCAP members, and ASCAP has historically refused to release vote counts with the election results. Results for the election are expected to be announced in March.

For biographies on ASCAP Writer Candidates in this year’s election, see http://www.ascap.com/about/elections/2009candidate_writers.pdf.

For biographies on ASCAP Publisher Candidates, see http://www.ascap.com/about/elections/2009candidate_publishers.pdf.

Comments

By D. Waldron on January 28th, 2009 at 9:13 pm

ASCAP is not paying out the royalties that cable networks pay them with cue sheets because ASCAP only pays royalties on plays ASCAP hits in its survey and ASCAP does not often (if ever) survey cable networks.
ASCAP’s legal department sent me a long response saying they are using an accepted statistical sampling method. However it dates to the days of top ten DJs.
A special that ran 6 times in one week on Turner was not in an ASCAP survey (which did not cover Turner at all in that time period) and even though Turner sent a cue sheet for it, ASCAP refused to pass on the royalty to the composer and publisher because the one hour special was never covered in ASCAP’s survey.
If cue sheets are no longer respected by ASCAP, what is happening to all the royalty money that should be payed on cue sheets?

By D. Waldron on January 28th, 2009 at 9:13 pm

ASCAP is not paying out the royalties that cable networks pay them with cue sheets because ASCAP only pays royalties on plays ASCAP hits in its survey and ASCAP does not often (if ever) survey cable networks.
ASCAP’s legal department sent me a long response saying they are using an accepted statistical sampling method. However it dates to the days of top ten DJs.
A special that ran 6 times in one week on Turner was not in an ASCAP survey (which did not cover Turner at all in that time period) and even though Turner sent a cue sheet for it, ASCAP refused to pass on the royalty to the composer and publisher because the one hour special was never covered in ASCAP’s survey.
If cue sheets are no longer respected by ASCAP, what is happening to all the royalty money that should be payed on cue sheets?

By D. Waldron on January 28th, 2009 at 9:13 pm

ASCAP is not paying out the royalties that cable networks pay them with cue sheets because ASCAP only pays royalties on plays ASCAP hits in its survey and ASCAP does not often (if ever) survey cable networks.
ASCAP’s legal department sent me a long response saying they are using an accepted statistical sampling method. However it dates to the days of top ten DJs.
A special that ran 6 times in one week on Turner was not in an ASCAP survey (which did not cover Turner at all in that time period) and even though Turner sent a cue sheet for it, ASCAP refused to pass on the royalty to the composer and publisher because the one hour special was never covered in ASCAP’s survey.
If cue sheets are no longer respected by ASCAP, what is happening to all the royalty money that should be payed on cue sheets?

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